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  RESIGNATION PROCESS
Total Articles: 31
The resignation process is a very long and drawn out ordeal that Mormons must endure to have their names removed from the records of the Mormon Church. Topics surrounding resignation.
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Planning To Resign From The Church?
Thursday, Mar 17, 2005, at 07:42 AM
Original Author(s): Kathy Worthington
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
If you are planning to resign from the church and you're going to use MormonNoMore.com as your guide, PLEASE read two sections of the website BEFORE sending in a resignation letter. Please read the INSTRUCTIONS and read THE PROCESS.

A lot of people use the sample letter on MormonNoMore.com to resign, but a certain percentage of those people do NOT read the Instructions and The Process first. They send a letter and then they write to me in distress because something happened that is absolutely standard operating procedure for the church.

Comments? Suggestions?

By the way, visits to the site are up by about 20% from last year at this time. Visits keep increasing, they rarely decrease, except perhaps for a single day or two.

Kathy Worthington

http://www.mormonnomore.com/
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LDS Church Tellling Parents Their Children Must Sign Resignation Letter
Wednesday, Jun 15, 2005, at 09:56 AM
Original Author(s): Infymus
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
Recently the LDS Church has been requesting that all minor children in a family that wishes to resign must sign the letter of resignation. Some Bishops are refusing to honor the resignation process if the minor children do not sign.

THIS IS COMPLETELY ILLEGAL.

Minor children of age 17 and under CANNOT LEGALLY SIGN ANYTHING.

If you are resigning from the LDS Church and having your children's names removed as well, do NOT allow your Bishop or Stake President to force your minor children to sign the resignation letter.

For help on resigning from the LDS Corporation, visit Kathy Worthington's site Mormon No More.

http://www.mormonnomore.com/.
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Before You Send In A Resignation
Wednesday, Aug 17, 2005, at 09:21 AM
Original Author(s): Kathy Worthington
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
I am the owner/operator of MormonNoMore.com.

I would like to urge you all to read the Instructions and The Process on MormonNoMore BEFORE you send in a resignation letter. Even better, read almost the entire website.

AFTER you read those sections you will know better what to expect when you send in a resignation. Many questions are answered there, like whether your relatives will find out about your resignation.

I'm not saying you shouldn't resign, just that it's best if you're well-informed about the process before you send the letter.

Kathy Worthington

link: http://www.MormonNoMore.com
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Leaving Mormonism Is About Being Strong And Courageous And Willing To Step Into The Real World Of Ideas
Monday, Oct 17, 2005, at 12:12 PM
Original Author(s): Susieq#1
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
Leaving Mormonism, however one approaches the exit process, is never about being weak. It is about being strong enough to feel the fear and do it anyway.

Leaving Mormonism is about keeping your self confidence, self esteem, self respect cranked up on high and not allowing anyone to destroy any part of you.

Leaving Mormonism is about picking ourselves up after being beat down and programmed.

Leaving Mormonism is not just about having hurt feelings or being offended, or having a bad experience. Life for everyone is filled with those kinds of experiences. If it were true that people left because of those notions, there would be no Mormons left in the church!

Leaving Mormonism is about taking your power back and owning it and not being intimidated by the leaders who put their pants on one leg at a time, just like you do!

It is about choosing not to live by the doctrines/policies of a powerful, controlling, authoritative church that has something to say about every facet of ones life from what one eats, how one dresses-right down to the regulation 24/7 underwear, how one spends money, and their time.

It is about setting boundaries and not allowing any Mormon leader to intrude into their personal lives, especially asking if one masturbates and other questions of a sexual nature. This is particularly inappropriate when a bishop interviews 12 to 19 year olds (males and females) in the privacy of his office with no parent present. (My view is that will have to stop and the sooner the better!)

Leaving Mormonism is about recognizing that covenants and promises made on fraud at baptism, in the temple, marriage ceremony, etc. are not binding, never were and never will be.

A careful study of DandC 132 with a comparrison of the temple marriage ceremony dialog and the endowments in the temple show that the policy of polygamy (New and Everlasting Covenent) has not stopped, only changed in how it is currently lived to comply with the laws that were in existance all along. Read carefully, recall what you said and did, the marriage ceremony is tucked into your covenant to give all you have (time, talents, money) to the church. Some wonder if they ever married each other, of if they married the church. Hard to tell!

Leaving Mormonism takes a huge dose of courage, tenacity and perseverance to withstand the onslaught of the Mormons who try to destroy your very essence. Their behavior at times, is deplorable. It is understood only by taking into account how well they have been imprinted and programmed by Mormonism.

These are the most dastardly Mormons who have preconceived ideas that those who leave must have sinned, not repented fully or enough or in the proper way, not tried hard enough, didn't read the scriptures enough or with sincere intent, did not pray enough or in the right way, did not have the right attitude, lost "the spirit," were adulterers, and apostates, labeling their prior friends and relatives as something less than acceptable. They operate out of a manufactured fear that they have lost their "Celestial Family."

Those who leave are often treated as an enemy -- the spawn of Satan, and as such are often shunned and ignored after being denigrated in the most despicable manner.

This is especially grievous behavior when it occurs in families and is used as a wedge.

They forget their own 11th Article of Faith in their zeal to denigrate and vilify anyone who leaves.

11th Article of Faith "We claim the privilege of worshiping Almighty God according to the dictates of our own heart, and allow all men the same privilege, let them worship how, where, or what they may."

It is a breath of fresh air to meet a Mormon who is respectful and will honestly honor the choice to leave Mormonism. It might be a little bit of a side-ways acceptance as they maintain the Mormon World View, but at least, some do try!

Leaving Mormonism is knowing and never forgetting that you are OK, you were OK all along. You are not the one that lied and perpetrated a fraud. You did nothing "wrong."

Leaving Mormonism is also about being able to have a good healthy, healing laugh at ourselves and the goofy, funny things we used to do.

Leaving Mormonism is about knowing that it is OK to be an authentic adult and choose your own underwear! How funny is that anyhow?

Leaving Mormonism is also about getting a 10% + raise and Sunday's off and ditching the God of Regulation Skivvies!

Hello world! Here I come!
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Allow Members To Resign
Thursday, Oct 20, 2005, at 09:36 AM
Original Author(s): Jason Kane
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
The relentless pursuit of locating “lost" LDS Church members can be admired on one hand and hated on the other. It is understandable that in transition some people are lost along the way, but there are those who want to be found and those who do not. When those who do not are located through invasive tactics, they rightfully feel invaded and feel they have been nothing short of stalked.

Once a person is tracked down, they may or may not be bothered by local members and leaders because there is no uniform way of stopping future contact.

A possible way of helping to ease tensions would be to allow the person who has been tracked to have the option of terminating their membership on the spot. Currently, one must jump through procedural hoops and be subjected to the arbitrary discretion of local leadership in order to resign.

If the LDS Church insists on tracking its “lost” members down, they must do so in a way that completely respects those who don't want to be found.

Jason Kane, Salt Lake City

http://www.sltrib.com/opinion/ci_3133...
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Resignation Anthem - Enjoy!
Thursday, May 4, 2006, at 08:07 AM
Original Author(s): Jillian
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
I've been feeling so great since I resigned that I was moved to create these new lyrics. Enjoy:

RESIGNATION ANTHEM
(tune: We Are All Enlisted)

Verse 1

Let’s all get unlisted and resign from the cult!
Happy we’ll be! Happy we’ll be!
Nevermore allow the church our minds to insult.
We will win the freedom of our souls!

Haste to the website: mormonnomore!
Kathy has the info; she knows the score!
Take back our power, Proudly to say
We once were lost, at great cost
Now we know the way!

Chorus:

Let’s all get unlisted and resign from the cult!
Happy we’ll be! Happy we’ll be!
Nevermore allow the cnurch our minds to insult.
We will win the freedom of our souls!

Verse 2:

Once it was a doctrine that we all held so dear.
Brainwashed were we! Brainwashed were we!
Now the clouds are lifted and the truth is so clear!
We have all been taken for a ride!

Hark! Common sense calls to us today.
“Don’t let the morg take your choice away!”
Truth stands before us happy and free.
The church is wrong; join the throng!
There’s no need to stay.

(Chorus)

Verse 3:

We were led by profits who were not so inspired.
Gave them our cash! Gave them our cash!
Wealth and power only are what they have admired.
Using us to spread their greedy plan!

They took our power, blinded our eyes!
Kept us too busy, taught many lies!
No time to wonder, Can it be wrong?
Oh! Mormon, Inc., what a stink!
Now we sing our song.
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There Is No Name Removal, Not Totally. We Can "Resign" Our Membership; A Term We Have To Teach The Mormons
Monday, Jun 12, 2006, at 07:33 AM
Original Author(s): Susieq#1
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
Resignation means you take your power back on your own terms. You tell them you are leaving and when.

Being exed means they get to act like they have some power over you and can threaten you and make you pay with shame and being shunned. What a bunch of nonsense!

Even when you resign, about all that happens is that eventually, the paperwork catches up and your name is "removed" from the local ward--geographic are where you live.

Other than that, they keep your records, and probably dead dunk you a year or so after you die! Silly people!

The other side of resigning your membership is knowing you are free and it is a kind of "closure" that shuts the door and finalizes a time of your life when you are no longer a Mormon.

It is my observation that if you are going to take your power back completely and own it, you resign your membership, you tell them what to do and when and how you want it done. No more asking, no more pleading, no more apologies. You are done with that!
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The Morg Does Not Want To Reduce The Number Of Members Of Record
Wednesday, Jun 21, 2006, at 07:45 AM
Original Author(s): Nao Crer
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
In the mid 90's I was in an area that split multiple wards and the stake based on the number of people that were on record in the area. The idea was that if the units were smaller the people would work hard to get inactives back to church. There were not enough active people to cover all of the positions and more people stopped coming because they were expected to cover multiple callings. There was talk of splitting it again. At the same time the wards and stake were going through the conversion to the incredibly crappy online records system (programed in Basic with direct low speed dial up to SLC). I was the guy working out the problems and training on the online system for the stake so I had all of the numbers.

We decided to take some action and printed out all of the long time inactives and "do not calls". We mail merged a form letter resignation and started contacting people, asking if they wanted to sign the letter. If they could not be found the records were sent to the COB as moved without a forwarding address.

When we started sending the resignations to COB, all hell broke loose. The SP and Bishops were called on the carpet. The Morg did not want to reduce the number of members of record. Growth was declining world wide and the number of resignations we were generating was much higher than the baptisms in that mission. They let us send the records back to the COB if the people could not be located, but not offer resignation to the people that could be located.

Money to the wards is based on people in Sacrament meeting. These numbers are often fudged to get more budget. The leaders are measured in part on the activity level in the unit, level of temple recommend holders in the unit, tithing from the unit, and temple attendance. For a unit leader it is better to have a small unit with higher activity. Most units don't want to go through the effort of cleaning their records.
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The Mormon Meaning Of Resignation
Wednesday, Jun 21, 2006, at 07:47 AM
Original Author(s): Hellmut
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
Remember, if it were up to the Mormon leadership there would be no such thing as resignation. They used to excommunicate anyone who wanted to leave their organization. The only reason why we have resignation is because someone forced it on the LDS Church when he sued for millions of dollars (check the details at the web site of the Mormon Alliance).

Resignation is not consistent with Mormon theology. Rather than membership in a voluntary organization, being Mormon is like being in the armed forces. People who want to leave are defectors. Resignation contradicts the authoritarian identity of the Mormon organization.
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Rewriting The Resignation Procedure
Thursday, Aug 24, 2006, at 08:37 AM
Original Author(s): Gettingout
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
Resignation should not necessarily involve local leaders. It should not matter in which ward your records currently reside.

You should be able to write Member Records in SLC directly, informing them of your resignation. Immediately upon receipt of your resignation letter they should mark your record with the fact that you resigned voluntarily (no other reason required) and remove your records from those of the main membership of the Church.

I recognize their need to maintain some record of your having been a member in case you should decide to rejoin in the future. They should therefore maintain a database of former member records for reference purposes, but these should not be counted toward the general membership of the Church.

If you send your resignation to a local bishop or stake president, the CHI should instruct them to immediately forward it to Member Records, where the process will be handled immediately and without delay.

You should be informed by letter from Member Records that your resignation has been recognized and that your name has been removed accordingly, and that you have thirty days to reverse the name removal by notifying the Church of your desire.

This is so much more efficient than the way things are currently handled.
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Finally Sent In My Resignation... Yeah, It's About Time
Wednesday, Sep 13, 2006, at 06:46 AM
Original Author(s): Squid
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
I have been lurking and occasionally posting on this board since the Summer of 2003. During that time I was attending law school and I had picked up a copy of Grant Palmer's book. In one traumatic evening my faith quickly crumbled, never to return. It was very depressing for me at the time. I was doing an internship in a city where I didn't know anyone. I was living in a cheap, stinky motel room in a bad part of town. After finishing Palmer's book, I remember leaving my room and walking aimlessly. I finally found a park and sat down on a bench and stared up into the sky, feeling completely and utterly alone in the universe -- a terrifying feeling that stayed with me for weeks. Losing my faith was by far the worst experience of my life. Yet, I couldn't deny it. Several months later I met up with Ken Clark (speaker at the last exmo conf) who happened to be living in my area at the time, and we've been friends ever since.

During the past 3 years I have read dozens of books on Mormonism and spent long periods of time on FAIR although I've never posted there. I've enjoyed the writings and comments of Southerton, Benson, McCue, Bachman, RandyJ, CraigC, JeffH, Skeptical, Mad Viking, CraigPaxton, Stray Mutt, Lost and Found, and many others (Btw, I picked my moniker "Squid" because at the time I was really into motorcycles and racing). Off the board I have enjoyed the writings of Dale Broadhurst, Stan Larson, Charles Larson, Dan Vogel, Will Bagley, Brent Metcalfe, Simon Southerton, Richard Van Wagoner, Grant Palmer, D. Michael Quinn and others. What a great group of people I hope to meet in person one day.

I was born into the church, served a mission, and went to BYU. Like Tal, I was a church fanatic. I knew the standard works inside and out at a young age. My first week into my mission I had won the multi-zone scripture chase contest going up against veteran missionaries. I drilled myself in scriptural debate. I never took it easy during my mission and I even made one of my companions cry because I made it clear to him that he was a slacker. Insane tracting-hours and making a public idiot out of myself in front of as many people as humanly possible in the name of the Lord was a badge of honor that I proudly wore.

The first time I became critical of LDS teachings was during my last year at BYU. I had a non-LDS psychology professor, Brent Slife, who asked his class a series of seemingly innocuous yet thought-provoking questions that I'm sure he designed to get his students to question their reality. It probably went over the heads of most in attendance, but those questions really got the wheels in my head turning (a dangerous pastime I know). It was only a matter of time before I found Signature Books, and then only a matter of time after that before I found Grant Palmer's book.

I am now an attorney in California. I'm single and I have the chance to build my life the way I want it to go from scratch. I do estate planning and try to save people money. I focus on helping a middle-class person get a great estate plan set up without it costing them an arm and a leg. I'm from a blue collar family and I want to maintain the appearance of such in my personal life. Helping other people out gives me a lot of satisfaction and it is upsetting to me when I see other attorneys gouge their clients - even when gouging has become standard industry practice. I realize I'm the same guy I've always been with or without the church. I'm always asking questions. I value truth and compassion above all else. And I sure as hell like to cheer for the underdog.

I would like to thank all of you for your many instructive and enlightening posts. Thanks to Eric K. and the admins.
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What My Solicitor Said About Resigning From The Morg In Australia
Thursday, Feb 1, 2007, at 06:48 AM
Original Author(s): Ausgaz
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
My purpose in going to the solicitor was to determine the the rights and remedies surrounding resignation from the church. The solicitor is a very well known solicitor in the city I live in and is known as "the bulldog".

I explained the immediate situation with my niece (being served church court papers then wanting to resign instead) and also my intention to resign myself at some point. His first reaction was "just don't go anymore and ignore their court". We spent about 10 minutes discussing the practices and culture of the church. He was flabbergasted. He said it sounded more like a group of stalkers or a cult than a religion. He couldn't understand why an organisation would want to keep track of members that didn't want to be there. I assured him that I understood how ridiculous this sounded but that I also understood how real it was for the people involved.

Firstly he confirmed that in Australia you are no longer a member of an organisation the minute you tell them you are not, similar to the US. This doesn't really mean anything in practice however. We weren't able to determine what, in law, you actually joined when you joined the mormon church. Although the church has legal entities to own buildings, collect money, pay support staff, etc., you do not become any sort of partial owner of that part of the church. There would be people who are but not the unpaid members. This is significant when it comes to the collection, retention and protection of private and personal information as the church has obligations under the Australian privacy laws in regards to any information they keep about you.

The church is free to have any policies and procedures it likes and is free to "excommunicate" members according to its own laws. Since it is essentially just a group of people playing house they can do what they like and you are only subject to the church as long as you allow yourself to be. Since, as a member, you don't legally belong to anything then there is no special legal situation when you want to resign. If you say you are a member then you are and if you say you are not then you are not. It isn't really anything in a legal sense. Again, he didn't know the situation in regards to the mormon church specifically but said since we didn't sign anything to become a part owner that it was probably the same as joining any other church.

I posed the question, "can the church still hold a church court even if you have resigned". He suggested that they can use their time however they like. They can go bowling, surfing or hold a church court if that is how they want to spend their time. Once you resign, which he stressed didn't really mean anything legally, then you are not a member.

I explained that if you don't actually resign that the church keeps information on you, has people who search for you when you move and occasionally makes contact regardless of how long you have not attended. I also explained that even if you are excommunicated or resign that the church still keeps records of your personal information including records of any moral issues, your performance on a mission, etc. He said they cannot do that. He suggested that we include in the letter of resignation a demand that the church destroy any personal information it has and that they confirm that they have complied with the request within 14 days. He said we should copy the letter of resignation to the federal Privacy Commissioner as it is a serious offense in Australia to keep information on people that they have not or do not authorise you to keep. It would be interesting to know if they comply or not. They would have to go through every monthly report and black out any reference to any callings and releases, they wouldhave to get SLC to remove references to mission information, including the controversial performance report, they would have to delete your Patriarchal blessing as well as any records on church action including any discipline taken at any time. They would have to remove any records they have of temple ordinances performed as well. If the church deletes the records the way it should you would be able to rejoin without ever disclosing that you had once been a member. That would be an interesting test :-).

On the issue of defamation it is only defamation in Australia if what is said is not true. I asked what would happen if the fact that an excommunication had taken place was leaked to the general members, even if you had resigned prior to the court. He felt that there would be no basis for action. The fact that the people were living together is true and the fact that a court was held and excommunicated them is also true, even though the excommunication doesn't mean anything legally. A difference would be if something personal and not generally known was told to a church leader in a situation that would be considered confidential. In that case the church leader (he used a more general term I can't recall at the moment) has a duty of care to respect the confidentiality of the information. The exceptions are outlined in law with child molesting being one of the more obvious examples. We didn't talk about the possible remedies in that case.

In summary I would say that you have fewer rights in Australia in regards to forcing the church to not excommunicate you if you resign. I would say that you have a lot more rights in ensuring that the church destroy all your information. I think that is good because it ensures that the church leaves you and your children alone. The last thing I would want is someone to happen to "fellowship" one of my children while they are vulnerable at some point and con them into thinking the church has the answer to all their problems.
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Kathy Worthington Passes Away
Tuesday, Feb 27, 2007, at 08:00 AM
Original Author(s): Kathy’s Family
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
This just in:
Dear Kathy's List readers, friends and acquaintances,

We are writing to inform you all that Kathy Worthington passed away a few days ago. Kathy’s life touched many, so many that we are already overwhelmed by the number of those who looked up to, appreciated, and loved her. We know that many of you will want to join us for a memorial in Kathy’s name. However, we are unable at this time to find an appropriate venue for this gathering – a gathering that we are assuming will require a large meeting center. Perhaps some of you have suggestions where we all may meet to celebrate Kathy’s life. Once we figure out the details of the memorial service we will send another email.

Thanks to you all,

Kathy's family.

Those of you not aware, Kathy was an advocate for fighting the Mormon Corporation to have names removed. She has helped thousands, if not tens of thousands of people get their names off the records of the Mormon Corporation - myself included.

Her site: http://www.mormonnomore.com/

If anything should happen to her site, I will be picking it up and hosting it myself if at all possible.

She will be greatly missed. From the Salt Lake Tribune:
Kathy Worthington 1950 ~ 2007 Kathy Worthington was born Oct. 20, 1950 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She died at her home in Taylorsville on February 22, 2007. The fourth child of six, Kathy grew up in Utah, Arizona and California. Kathy loved school and loved to learn about the world. She discovered her love of languages at the University of Utah. Never one to do anything halfway, Kathy went to Mexico in 1972 to study Spanish. While there, she met and married Rudy Ju rez (later divorced) and had two girls: Rita Lucia (Lucy) and Sonia Cristina (Cristy). Kathy also busied herself helping to build a community for the poor, and taught English for three years. Upon her return to the U.S., Kathy's hands were full raising two children and working full time. In 1989 Kathy came out as a lesbian. She immediately immersed herself in the gay community and soon gained celebrity status via her prominent role as a gay rights activist. She organized women's social and support groups, planned political rallies and was on the board of the Utah Stonewall Center in its early days. She founded the Womyn's Community Newsletter in April of 1991, which was published for four years. This influential publication played a pivotal role in creating a cohesive lesbian community in Utah. In 1992 Kathy's heart was utterly won over by Sara Hamblin, the woman whom Kathy described as her "wife, life partner and best friend." The two participated in political rallies, marched in Washington, and were married at "The Wedding," the huge group union ceremony performed at the 1993 March on Washington for gay rights. Kathy and Sara were legally married in Canada in 2003. In their 14 years together they traveled widely, visiting 17 countries as well as much of the U.S. Sara was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1995. They immediately became experts on the disease. Through their studies and determination, they successfully fought off the disease for 11 years. After a battle with the U.S. Postal Service, her employer from 1986 to her death, Kathy was granted leave in May of 1997 to care for Sara during her cancer treatments, a highly celebrated victory for the gay community. Sara died at home in Taylorsville on February 21, 2006 with Kathy and their family by her side. Kathy's reach extended beyond even her own imagining. Her name is everywhere, from her direct and poignant postings regarding Sara's battle with breast cancer on bcmets.org, to her prominent work in the ex-Mormon community. She was the founder and administrator of the preeminent website providing information on resignation from the Mormon Church, www.mormonnomore.com. Her work in the gay community cannot be overstated. Kathy's generosity reached even further. She agreed to translate for a woman who was shot by her husband. Once, while discussing this series of events, Sara summed up Kathy's irrepressible drive to reach out to others: "Kathy gets confused about words sometimes. Maybe in Spanish the word 'translate' means to take someone under your wing and do everything you possibly can for them, no matter what time of day or night, no matter the distance, no matter the danger. If that's what the word means, then Kathy did an excellent job of 'translating.'" Kathy was a healing and informative force unleashed upon the world. Kathy changed lives, from Sara's, who said she went from being in the closet to "out on the front porch with spot lights turned on," to close friends, to those she never even met through her work in the community and on her websites. Kathy is preceded in death by her wife, Sara Hamblin, their "Big Boy" Chiffy, mother Luella, father Dale and brothers Rick and Allen. She is survived by daughters, Cristy and Lucy, former husband Rudy Ju rez (Ronnie), sister Dolly (Larry), brothers Marty (Gayleen) and Craig (Debra), and her cats Missy and Squeaky. Jude, Dianna, Kathy, Annette, Chuck, Penny, Mandy, Marie and Misty are special friends who were very close to Kathy, and have been especially supportive in this last year. Marilyn knows what comfort she brought to Kathy, and her family is overwhelmed by their appreciation for her. Special thanks to Margie and Alma for their support. Kathy's family extends their thanks to those who loved and followed Kathy through her eventful and influential life. Kathy's wish was to be cremated and her ashes joined with Sara's. The two were never meant to be separated. A memorial for those who wish to celebrate Kathy's life will be held Sunday, March 4, 6-8 p.m. at the I.J. and Jeann‚ Wagner Jewish Community Center at 2 North Medical Drive, SLC; 581-0098. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the Utah Pride Center (www.utahpridecenter.org) or Best Friends Animal Sanctuary (www.bestfriends.org). A tribute to both Kathy and Sara may be found at http://www.geocities.com/kathywut/hom.... "Sometimes I feel downright wealthy," Kathy once said. "We are managing to do so many things that are exciting and fun that I feel very fortunate." Those of us whose lives were touched by Kathy's spirit feel just as fortunate to have known her.
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Did Anybody Know When They Were Baptized Into The LDS Church What It Would Take To Get Out Of It?
Tuesday, Feb 27, 2007, at 08:23 AM
Original Author(s): Susieq#1
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
There are all kinds of questions for "worthiness" to join the LDS Church, but nothing about what it would involve to resign your membership. Where is the contract that we signed that disclosed this process?

And, to top it off, the LDS Church does not seem to recognize: resignation.

Does anyone really resign from the LDS Church? Are any records destroyed or returned? Or are the names still counted in the total membership, even thought they can't verify who is even still alive?

And, who expected that if they chose not to attend that they would be hunted down, anywhere in the world - using other members to find your current address and phone?

Does the LDS Church have some rights or entitlement that gives them some authority to hunt down the members, chase them trough public records, call relatives, etc? Just because you are a member, at some time, does that give them the right to pursue you?

I say NO, NO, NO.

The LDS Church needs to back off, leave people alone, they will be there if they want to be there, and when someone resigns their membership, destroy the records and provide verification, or return them to the individual/family.

Also, they need to provide financial statements like they used to. Stop hiding. Stop acting like a criminal.
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Blackballing Within The Morg: A Member's Permanent File In Salt Lake City
Saturday, Nov 3, 2007, at 06:34 AM
Original Author(s): Alifeexamined
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
I was listening to a series of recent YouTube.com interviews with Paul Toscano of the September Six fame. At the end of the third video, Paul talks about a period early in his career when he was no longer called to any position in any of his Wards or Stakes. See, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tcBp2SrYjLA He suspected that someone may have flagged his permanent file in Salt Lake as a result of a rather minor run-in with authorities at BYU when he worked there for a short time previous to this. He called his friend, Hartman Rector [a General Authority], to check his permanent file to see if there was something in the file preventing him from receiving callings. Rector called back with the news that, “yes” there was a note in his file instructing local authorities not to call Paul to any position at the local level.

I have heard it asserted that a member’s file can be marked in this way but this is the first concrete example I have encountered illustrating that it actually can happen.

I sometimes wonder if my permanent file in Salt Lake was so marked. My first mission president in the England East Mission was bucking to be a general authority and in the wake of his excesses in seeking numbers, he alienated half the missionaries and most of the local leaders in the mission. His excesses (best left for another post) were so great that he was disfellowshipped from the church shortly after his return from his tenure as mission president.

My second mission president, who was called to clean up the mess left by the first mission president, was a contrast in extremes. The guy was more interested in speculating in the gold market and taking vacations to warmer parts of the world than in actually leading the mission. At one zone leadership meeting, he spoke passionately about how he felt he had been called as a mission president to clean up the excesses of the first president, and having done that, he asked each of us for our recommendation as to whether he should finish out his mission. Each of the zone leaders got up and urged the guy to stay with the exception of me. My response was that I thought the question was an inappropriate question to put to a missionary under his authority. I finished out my mission as a senior companion in Dover, England, about as far from mission headquarters as is possible to get.

Despite going on to complete three graduate degrees in some of the world’s finest academic institutions, despite being a faithful member of the church for years both in thought and deed, I was never called to any significant position within the church. Like Paul Toscano, I too thought that perhaps someone had flagged my permanent file in Salt Lake, but unlike Paul, I didn’t have a general authority friend I could call.
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The Issue Of When Church Resignation Is "Official"
Monday, Mar 24, 2008, at 07:25 AM
Original Author(s): Odell Campbell
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
With some interest I have read several posts on RfM which purport to give legal advice as to the issue of when a resignation is deemed official. The usual advice given is that a resignation becomes official when it is tendered to a local LDS church official, or to the appropriate office at the LDS church headquarters in Salt Lake City.

I have hesitated commenting publicly because as a practicing attorney, I am reluctant in offering legal advice or establishing an attorney-client relationship unknowingly with an anonymous poster. However, I would like to open a discussion in regard to this issue. By submitting this information, it is not my intent of offering any one specific legal advice. Please visit an attorney in confidence in order to solicit expert opinion. Only an attorney, aware of your state laws and your specific circumstances can give you good and proper advice.

I practice in the state of Oklahoma and am familiar with Oklahoma law. I certainly am not familiar with the specific laws outside of Oklahoma regarding resignation from a religious institution.

In the United States, there are generally two jurisdictions capable of addressing the issue of when resignation becomes effective, the federal system and the states' systems. As the First Amendment is a federal constitutional issue, I assume that federal courts could weigh in on the issue. I am not familiar with any reported decision from a federal court regarding this issue. So I can only infer that as of now, the issue of church resignation hasn’t been addressed by the federal courts.

This leaves this issue to state legislatures and courts. Again, I am unfamiliar with any state legislative code that addresses how church resignations are to be addressed. I am only familiar with one state which has addressed the issue at all, and that state happens to be Oklahoma.

In Oklahoma, the Oklahoma Supreme Court addressed the issue of church resignation in Guinn v. Church of Christ of Collinsville, 1989 OK 8, 775 P.2d 766, Justice Opala, a First Amendment expert, offered the opinion of the Court in a very interesting case regarding the relationship between church and parishioner. In Guinn, the Court held:

"By voluntarily uniting with the church, [Quinn] impliedly consented to submitting to its form of religious government, but did not thereby consent to relinquishing a right which the civil law guarantees her as its constitutionally protected value. The intentional and voluntary relinquishment of a known right required for a finding of an effective waiver was never established. On the record before us Parishioner - a sui juris person - removed herself from the Church of Christ congregation rolls the moment she communicated to the Elders that she was withdrawing from membership."

Id. at ¶31. Footnote 43 adds: “Parishioner's withdrawal was effective not later than upon the Elders' receipt of her resignation letter of September 25, 1981.”

Thus, in Oklahoma, the holding is that resignation is effective upon communicating to the church one’s intent to withdraw, but said resignation can only be deemed effective when receipt of said resignation letter is received.

As previously stated, I am not aware of any other state which has addressed this issue. Several years ago I ran a search on Westlaw and did not find any case on point. If anyone is interested, I would be happy to e-mail them my references on this issue.

What does this mean?

The Oklahoma Supreme Court decision, although very sound, is only binding in Oklahoma. In other jurisdictions it can only be used as persuasive authority. It is for each state’s own supreme court to declare the law for that state.

So, I mildly caution those on this board who tell posters with resignation issues that their resignation is effective upon written receipt, and not the protocol relied upon by the LDS church. Until the poster’s home state has issued an opinion on the subject, I believe that the issue remains unsettled outside of Oklahoma.

I would certainly welcome opposing opinions backed up with legal decisions or authority. Perhaps an interesting law review article could evolve from this discussion and subsequent research and writing.

The issue of membership and resignation was necessary for the court to address as to distinguishing what action a church could take with a member versus what action it could take with a non-member (or resigned member). In the Guinn case, the local Church of Christ refused to acknowledge her resignation. It had accused her as being a fornicator and was going to subject her to church discipline. Prior to the accusation, local elders had actually followed her around town to make their case against her.

Instead of subjecting herself to continued church harassment, she resigned with the aid of an attorney, who actually wrote the letter to the church. After her resignation, the church caused a letter to be read in local congregations accusing Guinn of being a fornicator.

At trial, the jury awarded Guinn a large amount of damages as a result of the pre and post resignation conduct by the church. The original damage award did not differentiate between pre and post resignation damages. The church appealed. The Oklahoma Supreme Court made several holdings when it reached them. The first is that the church also enjoys a First Amendment right to subject its members to certain reasonable governing techniques, including, apparently, following parishioners around. Thus, the court held that Guinn had subjected herself to being followed by being a member of the church and no damages were available for this alleged misconduct.

However, the Oklahoma Supreme Court held that after resignation was tendered the church could be held liable for its actions resulting in harm to Guinn’s reputation. It remanded the case to the trial court for a re-hearing as to the amount of damages Guinn was entitled to post-resignation.

So the case is important for at least three reasons:

First, a church can subject its members to reasonable governance by protection of the First Amendment and the implied consent of members.

Second, a person has a fundamental right to resign from a church via written communication.

Third, that a church is held at normal standards for damages it causes non-members including those who have withdrawn their membership.

In Oklahoma, the thirty day "waiting period, would not extend membership or the church's legal ability to subject you to its disciplinary system.

However, here it the point I was wanting to make, other states, including Mormon friendly Utah, might find the 30 day waiting period a reasonable and necessary action before resignation becomes effective. It remains unsettled.
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Requesting To Be Removed From The Records Is Futile!
Monday, Jun 16, 2008, at 07:47 AM
Original Author(s): Grnmessiah
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
Many of you have sent in a request to have your name removed from the official church records, which is . . . futile. Only one thing will come of it; you may not be called to clean the church on Christmas eve.

Dad didn't send in his official request to be removed until the person who was in charge of assigning people to clean the church sent him a letter within a few days of Christmas that he was called to clean the church on Christmas eve.

As you can understand, someone who had never been inside of that particular meetinghouse would not be very happy at being commanded to clean that meetinghouse.

Aside from the fact that you can avoid those infrequent calls to clean the meetinghouse, there is no real advantage.

These quotes from the Church Handbook of Instruction illustrate my point nicely:
Records with Annotations

In areas where the First Presidency has given authorization, an annotation may be placed on the ecord of a member whose conduct has threatened the well-being of other persons or of the church. An annotation helps the bishop protect Church members and others from such individuals. When a bishop receives an annotated membership record, he should follow the instructions in the annotation. Church headquarters will automatically annotate a person's membership record when the stake president or bishop:

1. Submits a Report of Church Disciplinary Action showing that the person was disciplined for incest, sexual offense against or serious physical abuse of a child, plural marriage, an elective transsexual operation, repeated homosexual activities (by adults), or embezzlement of Church funds or property.

2. Submits written notification that the person has been criminally convicted for one of these transgressions. Church headquarters also will automatically annotate a person's membership record when the stake president and bishop jointly submit written notification that the person has committed one of these transgressions before or after excommunication or name removal. In addition, the stake president and bishop may jointly recommend that a person's membership record be annotated for other conduct that threatens the well-being, of other persons or of the Church.
Your name is never removed, it is only put in a file, which really works well in the numbers game. You are still counted as being on their records until well after death. My father has crunched the numbers, and the average Mormon has to live to 110, for the numbers that they claim at the annual general conference to crunch.

Could anyone tell me what is not futile about just having the Bishop mark a VOID across your membership record?
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Why The Morg Requires Id For Resignations And Not For Baptisms
Wednesday, Nov 5, 2008, at 07:52 AM
Original Author(s): Cheryl
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
In spite of the fact that a couple of posters say ID is sometimes required for morg baptisms, I don't think this is standard.

What's standard is as much red tape as possible for resignations. Some ill informed bishops actually think they can require signitures from little children on a family letter of resignation.

Other equally deluded bishops think they must show up at every resignee's house to "prove" they live there or that they actually wrote the resignation letter with their signiture on it.

Some bishops are so dumb they think they can insist on hauling resigned members into the church office in an attempt to manipultate them back into a magical cult thinking.

These assumptions are IN-correct. In a free society we all have a right to join or resign from any church at any time.

Churches can follow their own rules for joining and participating.

Churches can't enforce internal rules for resignation. It's exactly like resigning from a job. We can say "I quit," and walk out. We can write a flowery letter. Or we can write a rude letter on toilet paper. If we don't want to be classy or professional, we can do any number of things I wouldn't recommend. But no one can force us to remain in a company where we were once on the payrole.

There's no legal requirement for a formal letter in order to resign from a church. There are no provisions in the law requiring a bishop interview or a waiting period. There are no laws about bishops conducting KGB-type investigations to prove who wrote or signed any letter.

Any person can leave a church by providing convincing evidence that they no longer want belong to it.

I never wrote a letter when I resigned because it happened before I knew that the church had lost a court case and they had admitted people DO have a right to choose not belong to their church. Before this, the only way mormons could leave was by enduring excommunication.

I refused to provide the charges for them to use against me. So there was never a court.

The morg bish sent me a letter and lied. He said I had requested to "have my name removed." Nope. I didn't know of such an option.

The mormon church is a cult. They don't typically care what happens to us. They care about their status and their organization. They typically want to protect their image, their revenue, their source of free labor, and their numbers.

Their rules for joining are lax to none.

Despite whatever is written in their handbook, their rules for resignation fluctuate depending on what they think any former member will tolerate. Their goal is always to gain new members and hold on to the ones they have.

Their goal isn't to serve human needs.
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Emotional Blackmail Over Resignation
Thursday, Nov 6, 2008, at 09:45 AM
Original Author(s): Ava
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
I think the LDS church knows exactly what position it puts its members in with the resignation process. I believe it is deliberate. Everything is based on the cornerstone of "families can be together forever".

Each mormon member of the family knows that it is up to them to remain mormon so the entire family can be reunited in heaven. Nothing they do in life is more important for familial love and approval.

The fascinating thing to me is that there is little to no biblical or Book of mormon reference to these processes. Like baptism for the dead, it's a mormon doctrine that evolved with little to no scriptural basis (not counting the DandC).

It gets under the family's skin with expectations. I remember countless testimonies from part-member families, praying that their non member would "see the light". Instead of loving the person in their lives now, instead of enjoying life now, there is this constant focus on the hereafter - the future. The person in the part-member family could never be happy - could rarely be seen as a full participating member because their family was not entirely mormon.

So what about the full member families? They are in a similar position, but not an open position. Every person in that BIC family knows that their family responsibility is to stay mormon so the whole family can be together in heaven.

It's more important than being honest, acting with integrity, being happy, being authentic or being reasonable.

Where does that leave the person who knows that they cannot remain mormon and be honest? That they cannot remain mormon and be happy?

The family's emotional approval is tied up in that official membership. This is what keeps people on the rolls - long after they have stopped attending.

Being honest about one's spiritual beliefs is downplayed. What matters is whether or not the "ordinances" have been done - not whether or not the person believes them. Of course, the family would prefer that everyone actually believe - but if they don't, at least the ordinances (like baptism) are still there.

I believe this is a dysfunctional model. I'm not saying that this is easy. I'm not saying my way is the right way. I believe these types of families (like my own family) need to admit this is the hopeless bargain. They (the LDS families) need to admit that their emotional well-being, approval and worldview are tied up in whether or not other people in their lives remain mormon. And it is deliberate, trying to control what cannot be controlled (another person's beliefs).

In family systems, it takes a tremendous amount of courage to speak up. To acknowledge the elephant in the room - the truths that no one wants to acknowledge. Until a person speaks up - explains the fallacy of such expectations - healing cannot happen. The family (IMO) remains locked in this cycle of denial.

As I said above, it's not easy. Some families and parents can accept the truth (about this emotional blackmail), others cannot. Some families react with anger, and still others will disown the children or loved ones who acknowledge the truth (that mormonism does not work for everyone).

I have compassion for everyone involved in this cycle. I've been through it. I was very, very fortunate with my parents and (to some extent) my extended family. It's a huge risk. I will say, even after 9 years, I have not regretted my decision to resign once. I knew it was the only honest, authentic thing for me to do. I had to be myself, and if my family or extended family could not accept me, then I had to be willing to give up that relationship.

It's an impossible situation to put anyone in (again, back to my incredible compassion for everyone invovled).
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The COB Is Behind On Resignations
Wednesday, Apr 8, 2009, at 08:11 AM
Original Author(s): Infymus
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
I monitor various recovery forums along with numerous emails I get concerning issues with resignation.

I have noticed a trend lately that resignations are taking weeks on end without any final letters being sent from the COB. My first instruction to people resigning is to contact COB membership records and politely inquire as to the status of their resignation.

What I’ve noticed is that the COB is backed up on both sides. Getting the original letter out stating it is an ecclesiastical matter – but more so the resignations are backed up in the COB after being processed by the Stake President and forwarded back.

The general consensuses from those who have contacted the COB have been told “we are very busy at the moment”.

I know that many issues plaguing the COB right now are fueling the resignations – like Prop 8, Big Love, the FLDS controversy, and the continued meddling in same sex marriage issues in Hawaii and Iowa.

My advice at the moment is to not get frustrated with the creaking slow machinery of the COB. They are a slow lumbering animal and with the hiring freeze the COB has right now, I’m sure that Greg Dodge and his staff are overwhelmed with resignation requests.

If you have sent in your resignation, but have not heard anything in weeks, or, you have already received your “stop being offended and come back” pamphlet – and 30 days after that have passed – you should contact membership records at the COB.

Member Records Division, LDS Church
50 E North Temple Rm 1372
SLC UT 84150-5310

801-240-2053 - Phone
801-240-1565 - Fax
1-800-453-3860 ext 22053 - Toll Free

Be kind to the Mormons that are handling the resignations as getting angry with them won’t hurry the process. They are gears in the machine – a machine full of antiquated methodologies run by old men who are out of touch by decades.

I still have never found a concrete number of resignations being handled by the COB each year. I’ve tracked pseudo numbers since 2005 and watched people post numbers, but I have never seen an accurate portrayal of just how many are resigning. From talk on various forums – there are an estimated 80k to 100k per year. Take that with a grain of salt.
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A Lawyer Resigns
Tuesday, May 5, 2009, at 07:45 AM
Original Author(s): Nah1207
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
I posted about 2 weeks ago and I'm proud to say I got my official "name removal" letter today.

April 14 - sent a sternly worded letter resigning from the church and making clear that any attempt to contact me in any way (other than written confirmation that my name had been removed) would be met by an immediate lawsuit.

April 17 - letter back from records indicating that my letter was forwarded to the local bishop and stake president because they consider it a "local ecclesiastical matter" (along with very cheap glossy bi-fold inviting me to stay).

April 22 -- letter from stake president indicating they would process promptly and would not attempt to contact me in any way.

April 30 -- letter from Dodge's office confirming that my name has been removed.

This could not have been easier, and I don't know why people so adamantly maintain TSCC makes it difficult to get out. All you have to do is threaten to sue and mean it. It also helps to send a copy of the letter to TSCC's office of general counsel.

Free at last. Free at last. Etc.
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"An Invitation" = Slobbery Drivel
Wednesday, Aug 12, 2009, at 08:34 AM
Original Author(s): Ortful Porpse
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
I received my letter back from church HQ today, along with my "An Invitation" pamphlet.

I read the pamphlet just for fun.

Sacred Zeus!! Are they serious?? This is the manner in which they attempt to 'invite' me back? Who wrote that? Seriously, I want to meet the guy! (And yes, it was a guy. Women would not be trusted to author an offical pamphlet.)

The tone is condescending, childish, and sortof rude. I wasn't sure if I should be offended or just roll on the floor laughing. I did some of both.

My favorite quote,

"We invite you to return and partake of the happiness you once knew."

This comes after the fake apology for unknown offenses of some thoughtless member...but before I'm told that the church needs my "strength, love, loyalty, and devotion" (money, free labor, blind obedience, and all free time.)

Nice glossy color phamplet. Perfectly corporate appearance. Nothing of substance inside.

So typical.

But, I'm numbered among the saints no longer!! What a great feeling!.
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Resignation: Local Versus COB Records
Monday, Aug 9, 2010, at 07:41 AM
Original Author(s): Derrida
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
Resigning is important because it removes your name from local records. The COB can have whatever records it wants evidently. But only members show up on local records. That means the Bishop wouldn't know you are a "person of interest" to him.

This gets complicated if you have family members still in the church. Then the ward clerk or membership clerk probably does build a local record for you with your family members even if you do resign. The local church leadership wants to know your household status--who is head of house? Who is a member or not in this now (because you resigned) part-member family?

Also, as long as you are a member of record, the church can legally discipline you if it wants. Let's say that you speak out against the church. They discover you are a member. They will hold a court of love (Orwell anyone?) and excommunicate you.

Now they can claim that THEY fired YOU because you were such a bad person, etc. This can be used to implicitly besmirch your good name and reputation. Certainly that would be the light cast on you to the other church members: "He was excommunicated." "I wonder what he did wrong?" "Better stay away from her." "Why would you hire him? He was excommunicated don't you know? Who knows what sin he commmitted." "Don't let your kids around her, she was excommunicated." Etc.

If you resign, then you take charge. Then church members have to wrap their minds around the fact that someone VOLUNTARILY left. Someone stood up to be counted OUT for his or her own reasons. What could those be? Now the frame for those reasons is broader. The completely mind-wiped will want to assume that you must have had an urge to sin, so that's why you left. But others may wonder; and if the issue ever comes up as a public matter, then you have the moral highground. The church hates that. They can't color your resignation as they could an excommunication, painting you as too flawed for them. They have to deal with the fact that YOU saw them as too flawed.

That's why I will send in my resignation. I want to say what I want to say and do what I want to do, and not be AFRAID that the church will decide to excommunicate me for this or that perceived offense or sin, easily claiming me as the flawed one. I want to be free to follow my own conscience, like most other Americans.
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A Bishop In England Quits The Church
Tuesday, Dec 20, 2011, at 09:09 AM
Original Author(s): Nick Humphrey
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
His letter to ward members - the highlights:
"My research has only involved studying church history and commentary, Mormon and Ex-Mormon Intellectual websites and not “evangelical Christian anti-Mormon lies.”

I didn’t realise for instance that Joseph Smith practised polygamy, and was married to 33 women, most under the age of 20, one as young as 14. That some of Joseph’s wives were already married to other men when he married them; a practice called polyandry. All of these facts can be confirmed by a simple look at the church’s own website, familysearch.org.

I didn’t know that all polygamous marriages were illegal in the USA. Yet we believe in “Obeying, honouring and sustaining the law. “

I have learnt an awful lot about the church which the General Authorities, though accepting as true, refuse to tell the general membership for fear of destroying faith!

There are many other issues, like; there are several accounts of the First Vision and Joseph Smith’s initial personal journal entry about the First Vision didn’t include seeing God the Father and Jesus Christ, but an angel. Then over the years the story got embellished till it changed to what we have today. Yet I was told it was the most momentous event to occur in this dispensation. Why didn’t Joseph initially record it correctly? And there are so many other things that have just dissolved my faith to the point I can no longer bear a testimony of the truthfulness of this church or even God."
http://stevebloor.wordpress.com/2011/...

His letter to the stake president (goes more in-depth into why he quit):

http://stevebloor.wordpress.com/2011/...
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Why You Need Your Name-Removal Letter
Thursday, Aug 15, 2013, at 07:42 AM
Original Author(s): Infymus
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
Back in 1985 a guy named Norman Hancock wrote a letter of resignation to the Mormon Church. Instead of honoring his resignation, the Mormon Church excommunicated him. Hancock filed a lawsuit against the Mormon Church claiming that a person has the legal right to voluntarily resign from any Church. While filed for $18 million dollars, the Mormon Church embarrassingly settled the case of out court and the case was sealed.

Legally in the US, once you hand over a letter of resignation to a Church - you are officially no longer a member. This means any duties and obligations (beyond legal) are terminated. And this legal state can be used against any Church that continues to harass you beyond your final resignation.

The Mormon Church will legally honor your final resignation when legally pressed to do so. Otherwise, the Mormon Church will continue to operate in its billion dollar monolithic patriarchal fashion it has for the last 100+ years.

There is a growing consensus among Ex-Mormons that mailing your resignation letter to the Mormon Church is all that is necessary and regardless of what the Mormon Church does after that is inconsequential. The true fact is thus: Unless the Mormon Church processes your membership records and marks your file as "Name-Removal" then you will remain a member of the Mormon Church until you are 110 years old. The Mormon Church will not honor your original resignation letter unless legally challenged on it. The Mormon Church will then hunt you down indefinitely for reactivation attempts. This means HTs, VTs, SP, BP and Mormon neighbors will visit you asking you to "Come" back and that "We Love You". Not only this, you or your family will receive continual calls and letters from the Mormon Church searching for you - in a constant never ending reactivation program.

SO WHAT if the US law states legally by tendering resignation you are officially out. The Mormon Church only obeys the law when it is forced to. Until they send you a letter stating they've processed you - they will consider you a member.

You must pursue them until you receive your final letter from the Mormon Church stating your name has been removed. The Mormon Church is a billion dollar corporation disguised as a Church. You have to treat the Mormon Church like it is - a business. And you have to file paperwork and get your name removed as if you were stopping a business contract. If you don't get your final letter then you are still their potential, long lost customer.

The reason I wrote this is due to so many thinking that by sending them a letter - you're out. Then, when the Church comes looking for them later, they'll waive the letter in their faces. Fine. Until you get that final resignation letter from them - you will continue to be considered a member. With each new set of missionaries that come through the COB or local ward leaders - you will be a target. Every time you move somewhere - the local Ward leaders will come knocking. You will be a target - forever.

To stop the harassment you must get your final name removal letter. If you don't pursue that letter, then don't complain about having to waive law papers in front of the Church each time they knock on your door.

For complete information on how to have your name removed from the Mormon Church visit MormonResignation.com at http://www.mormonresignation.com.
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Take Heart From Hancock: You Can Stand Down The Mormon Cult And Resign!
Monday, Aug 19, 2013, at 08:48 AM
Original Author(s): Steve Benson
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
As a personal preface, I wasn't "allowed" by the Mormon Cult to resign my membership (as some have suggested, supposedly due to my in-Cult family heritage). Rather, I resigned without seeking or being given Mormon Cult permission to do so. As far as I was concerned, it was a simple decision: Damn the demagogues; full speed ahead. To me, being "excommunicated" suggests that a believer is being kicked out of the Mormon Cult against their will. I was no longer a believer and wanted out on my own terms.

Besides, as has been demonstrated by the famous Norman Hancock case, it is unlawful for the Mormon Cult to force a member to remain in the ranks (through refusing to recognize their individual right to voluntarily resign), in order for the Mormon Cult to excommunicate them.

Enter Hancock, a lifelong Mormon who decided he finally wanted out. Thanks to Hancock's determination (and putting it bluntly), his case knocked the Mormon Cult back on its abusive butt.

Hancock served notice of his membership resignation but the resignation was rejected and Hancock was summarily excommunicated by a clueless Cult court. The endgame played out with Hancock subsequently suing the Mormon Cult for multi-millions of dollars in damages, which got the Cult's attention real quick. The Cult melted like Jell-O in the hot sun and relented, thereby recognizing Hancock's inherent right to resign.

Here's a brief synopsis:

"'Excommunication of Non-Members, Norman Hancock'

"The case of Norman Hancock is an interesting one. It establishes firmly that churches cannot excommunicate members who leave during discipline, based on the Marian Guinn precedent. That once someone quits instantly their legal protections against libel and slander are restored. The state has no authority over the the disciplinary process within the church, but the person has no longer given their consent and this changes things.

"The case is standard. In 1985 the Mormon Church excommunicated Norman Hancock after he submitted a letter of resignation to the Church. Hancock filed an $18 million lawsuit against the Church, saying a person has a right to voluntarily resign from a church. The suit was settled out of court. Church representatives agreed to change the records such that there would no longer be any record of an 'excommuication'; the records would show that he resigned-- that is, he had asked his name be removed from the Church roll."

http://church-discipline.blogspot.com...

For the blow-by-blow details of Hancock's infuriating but ultimately successful case as described in a report authored by Lavina Fielding Anderson for the "The Mormon Alliance," see: http://mormon-alliance.org/casereport...

As another individual aside, one of the former Mormons who wrote in support of Hancock's right to resign his membership was John W. Fitzgerald, who was thrown out of the Mormon Cult in 1972 for his opposition to its ban on African-American males receiving the priesthood. He wrote:

"The guarantee voiced in the Constitution of freedom of speech, freedom of the press and freedom of religion, also contains with it the concept of freedom from religion; that no individual or religious organization can coerce or force anyone to join or stay in any religious group against his or her will. . . .

"Norman L. Hancock's suit against the LDS Church for possible defamation of character . . . was settled out-of-court when the Church agreed to drop him from membership without the taint of excommunication, which is very real in Mormon communities.

"[It is time for the Church to take] a long look at their policy on excommunication and their practice of ignoring requests of individuals to have their names removed from the rolls of their church.

"The LDS Church is a pseudo-democracy. It never claimed to be a democracy like the one we believe in, where secrets ballots are taken, and it is nobody's business how one votes."

(John W. Fitzgerald, "Freedom from Religion," in "Salt Lake Tribune," 6 March 1985, p. A-17)

John W. Fitzgerald (or Dr. Fitzgerald, as I knew him) was my principal at Morningside Elementary in Salt Lake, where I attended 3rd and 4th grade. I remember him being a strong, thoughtful man who played the violin beautifully and who, sadly enough, announced to all of us students assembled in the school cafeteria on November 22, 1963, that President John F. Kennedy had been assassinated.

At any rate, I personally phoned Hancock (who was living in Mesa, AZ at the time) to congratulate him for his courage and tenacity in standing down the Mormon Cult. He graciously and matter-of-factly accepted the compliment. What Hancock did in behalf of individuals seeking to sever their membership with the Mormon Cult was an absolutely amazing personal story; an historically ground-breaking event in the annals of LDS-inflicted bullying; and a stirringly significant reminder of what can be done to fight and win against tyrannical theological overreach.

Yo, Salt Lake: Beware the Storm of Norm!

:)
topic image
Mormon Membership Resignation, U.S. Law And The Case Of Norman Hancock
Monday, Jan 6, 2014, at 07:50 AM
Original Author(s): Steve Benson
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
In the case of Norman Hancock of Mesa, AZ, he resigned from the Mormon Church but the resignation was not accepted and Hancock was excommunicated. The endgame of it all: Hancock subsequently sued the Mormon Church for millions of dollars and the Mormon Church relented, allowing him to resign.

--Below are some assessments of this landmark case:
"Excommunication of non-members: Norman Hancock

"The case of Norman Hancock is an interesting one. It establishes firmly that churches cannot excommunicate members who leave during discipline, based on the Marian Guinn precedent. That once someone quits instantly their legal protections against libel and slander are restored. The state has no authority over the the disciplinary process within the church, but the person has no longer given their consent and this changes things.

"The case is standard. In 1985 the Mormon Church excommunicated Norman Hancock after he submitted a letter of resignation to the Church. Hancock filed an $18 million lawsuit against the church, saying a person has a right to voluntarily resign from a Church. The suit was settled out of court. Church representatives agreed to change the records such that there would no longer be any record of an 'excommuication': the records would show that he resigned, that is he had asked his name be removed from the Church roll."
http://church-discipline.blogspot.com...

--More on the Hancock case as far as legal precedent is concerned:
"Legal Precedent

"[The Hancock] case is important to establish the [Mormon] church's vulnerability to lawsuits when they refuse to honor resignations. . . .

"THE NORMAN HANCOCK LAWSUIT (Mesa AZ 1985)

"In 1985 the Mormon Church 'excommunicated' Norman Hancock AFTER he submitted a letter of resignation to the church. Hancock filed an $18 million lawsuit against the Church, saying a person has a right to voluntarily resign from a church. The suit was settled out of court and the settlement was sealed. An account on line reports that Hancock filed the suit himself, without the aid of a lawyer, after studying the Guinn case [see the link below for an explanation of that particular case]. The same account says that [Mormon] Church lawyers started discussing with Hancock just how much money he wanted, but he told them he didn't want their money, that what he wanted was to have his name cleared. Church representatives agreed to change the records such that there would no longer be any record of an 'excommunication': the records would show that he resigned (that he asked for 'name removal').

"The Hancock case shows that the [Mormon] Church is willing to settle out of court when someone sues because the Church 'excommunicates' them after they've resigned their membership. There were some defamation issues in the Hancock case that do not apply to most other cases, however.

"The Guinn and Hancock cases were the end of the era when the [Mormon] Church told members that there was no way to stop being a member except by excommunication. The Church began having a process it calls 'name removal.' However, the Church still tells bishops and stake presidents that a member who is 'transgressing' should not be allowed to resign, that 'name removal should not be used as a substitute for Church discipline.' If you've paid attention to the Guinn case, you already know that the [Mormon] Church is wrong about that and they can be sued for 'excommunicating' someone who already resigned. At Church headquarters they know this very well and they will usually put a quick halt to 'discipline' proceedings if they find out that the former members knows what his or her rights are."
http://www.mormonnomore.com/legal-pre...

--An overview of how Hancock used American law to stand down the power-abusing Mormon Church:

"Individuals . . . have used their membership in the American legal community to challenge Latter-day Saint Church courts and procedures in other ways. In 1985, Norman Hancock sued the LDS Church after a Church court excommunicated him. Hancock claimed that the Church court proceedings defamed him, placing 'him in a false light in the public eye' and 'permanently injur[ing] his reputation, business, and standing in the community.' He reasoned that 'the term excommunicated itself is damaging to my reputation among both Mormons and non-Mormons . . . because it presumes someone is bad or has done something wrong.' When he had approached Church leaders asking that his name be taken off Church records, the Church leaders initiated |Church court proceedings. Hancock claimed that he should have been free to disassociate himself from the church formally without the epithet of excommunication attached to his name. The case ultimately settled out of court. . . .

"Whether or not there is any connection in fact with Hancock's suit against the LDS Church filed in 1984, with Janice Paul's case against the Jehovah's Witnesses or Marian Guinn's case against the Church of Christ, or any other civil court case, LDS Church procedure regarding voluntary disassociation and ecclesiastical discipline changed in the 1989 General Handbook. The 1983 General Handbook makes no mention of what a bishop or high council should do if a member requests that his name be removed from the church's records, although in practice the request was treated as an act of apostasy. The 1989 General Handbook, on the other hand, specifically states that if a member makes a formal written request that his membership be revoked, the local leaders should comply with that request by filling out several forms and sending them to the Church offices rather than initiating a disciplinary council. The 1989 General Handbook does caution, however, that if ecclesiastical leaders are considering disciplinary action,the administrative name removal process should not be used as a substitute for a disciplinary council.

"The change to an administrative procedure reflects a core American value: individual freedom and the right of association. Although the consequences in terms of membership in the religious community are the same, the change from disciplinary action to administrative procedure shifts the emphasis away from the community's formal control of membership toward the individual's freedom to choose. However it came about, a value central to membership in the American legal community emerged *602 in the way the Latter-day Saint community and its courts adjudicate membership."

http://www.aliveonline.com/ldspapers/...

--Summary of the Norman Hancock Case

First, as a personal preface to the following wrap-up, I wasn't "allowed" by the Mormon Cult to resign my membership (as some have suggested, supposedly due to my in-Cult family heritage). Rather, I resigned without seeking or being given Mormon Cult permission to do so. As far as I was concerned, it was a simple decision: Damn the demagogues; full speed ahead. To me, being "excommunicated" suggests that a believer is being kicked out of the Mormon Cult against their will. I was no longer a believer and wanted out on my own terms.

Besides, as has been demonstrated by the pivortal Hancock case, it is unlawful for the Mormon Cult to force a member to remain in the ranks (through refusing to recognize their individual right to voluntarily resign), in order for the Mormon Cult to excommunicate them.

Hancock was a lifelong Mormon who decided he finally wanted out. Thanks to Hancock's determination (and putting it bluntly), his case knocked the Mormon Cult back on its abusive butt.

Hancock served notice of his membership resignation but the resignation was rejected and Hancock was summarily excommunicated by a clueless Cult court. The endgame played out with Hancock subsequently suing the Mormon Cult for multi-millions of dollars in damages, which got the Cult's attention real quick. The Cult melted like Jell-O in the hot sun and relented, thereby recognizing Hancock's inherent right to resign.

For the blow-by-blow details of Hancock's infuriating but ultimately successful case as described in a report authored by Lavina Fielding Anderson for the "The Mormon Alliance," see: http://mormon-alliance.org/casereport...

As another individual aside, one of the former Mormons who wrote in support of Hancock's right to resign his membership was John W. Fitzgerald, who was thrown out of the Mormon Cult in 1972 for his opposition to its ban on African-American males receiving the priesthood. He wrote:

"The guarantee voiced in the Constitution of freedom of speech, freedom of the press and freedom of religion, also contains with it the concept of freedom from religion; that no individual or religious organization can coerce or force anyone to join or stay in any religious group against his or her will. . . .

"Norman L. Hancock’s suit against the LDS Church for possible defamation of character . . . was settled out-of-court when the Church agreed to drop him from membership without the taint of excommunication, which is very real in Mormon communities.

"[It is time for the Church to take] a long look at their policy on excommunication and their practice of ignoring requests of individuals to have their names removed from the rolls of their church.

"The LDS Church is a pseudo-democracy. It never claimed to be a democracy like the one we believe in, where secrets ballots are taken, and it is nobody’s business how one votes."

(John W. Fitzgerald, "Freedom from Religion," in "Salt Lake Tribune," 6 March 1985, p. A-17)

John W. Fitzgerald (or Dr. Fitzgerald, as I knew him) was my principal at Morningside Elementary in Salt Lake, where I attended 3rd and 4th grade. I remember him being a strong, thoughtful man who played the violin beautifully and who, sadly enough, announced to all of us students assembled in the school cafeteria on November 22, 1963, that President John F. Kennedy had been assassinated.

At any rate, I personally phoned Hancock (who was living in Mesa, AZ at the time) to congratulate him for his courage and tenacity in standing down the Mormon Cult. He graciously and matter-of-factly accepted the compliment. What Hancock did in behalf of individuals seeking to sever their membership with the Mormon Cult was an absolutely amazing personal story; an historically ground-breaking event in the annals of LDS-inflicted bullying; and a stirringly significant reminder of what can be done to fight and win against tyrannical theological overreach.

Yo, Salt Lake: Beware the Storm of Norm!

:)
topic image
"Name Removal" "Resigning Membership" In The Mormon Church
Wednesday, Jan 29, 2014, at 07:27 AM
Original Author(s): Devilsaintdevil
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
The fact that they are organized as corporations is irrelevant to tax status. The evaluation in the tax code ignores the form or legal organization and instead focuses on purposes. http://www.irs.gov/Charities-and-Non-Pr... . As long as you are engaged in those activities you can get away without paying taxes.

Note: It is also true that profits cannot inure to a shareholder, but must be reinvested. http://www.irs.gov/Charities-%26-Non-...
  1. There is no Church beyond what DC 10:67-68 says. Literally, legally there is no Mormon Church.
  2. There used to be a Church, but it was dissolved by the Edmunds-Tucker Act over the polygamy issue. It was never reorganized as a Church with members.
  3. Typical American protestant churches have members. Leaders in those Churches have fiduciary duties to their members. Members have legal rights in their Church.
  4. "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints" is a registered trademark owned by Intellectual Reserve, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of The Corporation of the President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It isn't an organization. It is like a slogan ("Just Do It") or brand ("Coke Zero") or d/b/a ("Kentucky Fried Chicken" owned by YUM! Brands, Inc.)
  5. The COTPOTCOJCOLDS is what is called a corporation-sole. It has only one shareholder/member. Currently Thomas S. Monson is that shareholder/member. He owes you no duty. You have no voice, rights, or say of any kind regarding the operation of the corporation. (Note: There is also a Corporation of the Presiding Bishop OTCOJCOLDS and various other local Corporations of the President of the ________ Stake that are also set up as corporation-soles. I understand that the Oakland Temple property is owned by the COTPOT Oakland Stake OTCOJCOLDS. In addition to the corporation-soles there are a bevy of subsidiary corporations like Intellectual Reserve, Inc. which holds the intellectual property rights of the Church.)
  6. The COTPOTCOJCOLDS (probably, it could be a subsidiary) owns and maintains a computer system. That system includes records of all people who have been blessed as a baby in a Mormon meeting. Confusingly they call these people "members", which they are not. (Note: Not even "members" by their own doctrine which requires baptism and confirmation--but blessed children are counted as "members" in the computer system and resulting published and reported statistics--and none are legal "members/shareholders".)
  7. Once you are in that computer system, you will never be out of that computer system. Ever. If you "resign" your "membership" what you are actually doing is asking them to annotate your record in the computer system to say you do not submit to them (they call this apostasy). When they excommunicate you they are simply annotating your record to memorialize you as a sinner (one of the sins could be apostasy). (Note: This is true in America. In the UK they have a statute saying that if a person wants out of a religion, the religion has to really remove all record of them. The Church was sued and lost a suit on this point about a decade ago and now actually remove the names of UK members who resign--at least from computer systems in the UK, I'm fairly certain they keep a separate record in the US. The two guys who won that lawsuit were awarded damages of some-odd thousand pounds.)
  8. Mormon leaders clearly teach and believe, based on scattered scriptural teachings (maybe most clearly set forth in DandC 128, really you should check it out) that the record that they keep is sealed on earth and sealed in heaven, it will be presented to God as an offering of the Sons of Levi (them) and if your name is not found in good standing therein, you will be damned in your progress and not found in the sealing chain back to the literal Adam and Eve. If your record is annotated, God cannot accept you, he is bound by their annotations. Your salvation depends on their approval, they believe.
I'm not arguing that anyone should or shouldn't "ask for your name to be removed" or "resign your membership" and so forth. I just think most people don't realize that these are metaphors and they don't realize what actually happens in fact.
topic image
I Just Dropped 1,830 Resignation Letters In The Mail, I Completed 679 Before That, And Dad...
Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015, at 10:23 AM
Original Author(s): Chubs_gato
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
The last few days have been a roller coaster of emotion. Saturday was one of the best days of my life. Sunday was one of the worst.

My father passed away yesterday morning. He is a big reason that I am the man I am today. He led our family out of TSCC in 1999. There were no support groups, no online forums, and we lived in Orem, UT (MoCentral).

Without his courage, I might still be there. He taught me to always question what I was told. He taught me to think for myself. He taught me to always look to help others.

I am going to miss him. I am still crying now and then. The support I am getting from this community has been amazing. That makes me cry too.

Edit: Your support has been incredible! I don't know how to thank you guys for lifting me up in my time of need.

For those of you who sent money via the PayPal provided by my friend. Thank you! It was received and I promise to use it for postage, supplies, and pay the support staff who has been helping me with this project. I have asked her to remove the address, however. I have always asked that you take the money you would be willing to pay me and donate it to charity. Here are a few I would recommend:

The ACLU of Utah

Equality Utah

Utah Pride Center

Human Rights Campaign

OUTReach
topic image
This Utah Lawyer Is Working Pro Bono to Help People GTFO of the Mormon Church
Thursday, Nov 19, 2015, at 07:22 AM
Original Author(s): Jon Levine
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
From Yahoo News:
With the Mormon church's announcement earlier this month that children of same-sex couples would not be allowed to join the church until they are 18, and that married same-sex Mormon couples could face excommunication, a growing number of church members have begun having second thoughts about the country's most famous home-grown religion. More than 1,000 have gone so far as to renounce their faith in the process.

For most of the individuals looking to cut ties, that process is far more complicated than simply skipping church services.

"You'd contact your local leadership, you will call a bishop and tell them, 'We don't want to be on the records anymore,'" Mark Naugle, a 30-year-old immigration attorney and ex-Mormon, told Mic. "They most likely won't take that well, they'll accuse of sinning, put you on a 60-day waiting period, call you for meetings, send people over from the ward to try and talk you back into it."

Those heavy-handed tactics are exactly why Naugle, who is based near the church's headquarters in Salt Lake City, has spent the last six years helping Mormons leave the institution. Once an individual transfers to him the power of attorney, Naugle can insist church officials to deal exclusively with him, and forbid them from contacting his clients. When confronted with the dispassion of the law, church leadership typically takes a far more conciliatory tone, often confirming the renunciation in a matter of days. "They don't try and contact the family anymore, they go through me and it's over," Naugle said.
See: http://news.yahoo.com/utah-lawyer-wor...
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Mormonresignation.com Jumps 1666.9% In Unique Visits Since November 6th
Thursday, Nov 19, 2015, at 07:30 AM
Original Author(s): Infymus
Topic: RESIGNATION PROCESS   -Link To MC Article-
MormonResignation.com has jumped 1666.9% since November 6th. On average I get around 50-100 unique visits per day. On Nov 6th, it hit 7845 unique visits - and is now running at nearly 2k per day. Yesterday I received a $100 donation from someone who used the site to resign. That will pay all my hosting fees for 4 months, I am very grateful for that. Very much appreciated and I am so glad that I can help.

When Kathy Worthington passed away in 2007 and Mormonnomore went down, I felt strongly that her legacy needed to live on - and so I created Mormonresignation. Mormonnomore has been back online thanks to many generous people and both sites I'm sure are doing well. I miss Kathy a lot, I wish she hadn't taken her life. This fight for LGBT was her fight and it has been so unfair.

You guys are doing great work here and people are resigning. Keep going.
 
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Archived Blogs:
Planning To Resign From The Church?
LDS Church Tellling Parents Their Children Must Sign Resignation Letter
Before You Send In A Resignation
Leaving Mormonism Is About Being Strong And Courageous And Willing To Step Into The Real World Of Ideas
Allow Members To Resign
Resignation Anthem - Enjoy!
There Is No Name Removal, Not Totally. We Can "Resign" Our Membership; A Term We Have To Teach The Mormons
The Morg Does Not Want To Reduce The Number Of Members Of Record
The Mormon Meaning Of Resignation
Rewriting The Resignation Procedure
Finally Sent In My Resignation... Yeah, It's About Time
What My Solicitor Said About Resigning From The Morg In Australia
Kathy Worthington Passes Away
Did Anybody Know When They Were Baptized Into The LDS Church What It Would Take To Get Out Of It?
Blackballing Within The Morg: A Member's Permanent File In Salt Lake City
The Issue Of When Church Resignation Is "Official"
Requesting To Be Removed From The Records Is Futile!
Why The Morg Requires Id For Resignations And Not For Baptisms
Emotional Blackmail Over Resignation
The COB Is Behind On Resignations
A Lawyer Resigns
"An Invitation" = Slobbery Drivel
Resignation: Local Versus COB Records
A Bishop In England Quits The Church
Why You Need Your Name-Removal Letter
Take Heart From Hancock: You Can Stand Down The Mormon Cult And Resign!
Mormon Membership Resignation, U.S. Law And The Case Of Norman Hancock
"Name Removal" "Resigning Membership" In The Mormon Church
I Just Dropped 1,830 Resignation Letters In The Mail, I Completed 679 Before That, And Dad...
This Utah Lawyer Is Working Pro Bono to Help People GTFO of the Mormon Church
Mormonresignation.com Jumps 1666.9% In Unique Visits Since November 6th
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  · EX-MORMON OPINION - SECTION 21 (25)
  · EX-MORMON OPINION - SECTION 22 (24)
  · EX-MORMON OPINION - SECTION 23 (25)
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  · EX-MORMONISM SECTION 1 (25)
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  · JOSEPH SMITH - WORSHIP (13)
  · JUDAISM (3)
  · JULIE B. BECK (6)
  · KEITH B. MCMULLIN (1)
  · KERRY MUHLESTEIN (9)
  · KERRY SHIRTS (6)
  · KINDERHOOK PLATES (6)
  · KIRTLAND BANK (6)
  · KIRTLAND EGYPTIAN PAPERS (17)
  · L. TOM PERRY (5)
  · LAMANITE PLACEMENT PROGRAM (3)
  · LAMANITES (36)
  · LANCE B. WICKMAN (1)
  · LARRY ECHO HAWK (1)
  · LDS CHURCH (19)
  · LDS CHURCH OFFICE BUILDING (9)
  · LDS OFFICIAL ESSAYS (22)
  · LDS SOCIAL SERVICES (3)
  · LGBT - AND MORMONISM (44)
  · LORENZO SNOW (1)
  · LOUIS C. MIDGLEY (6)
  · LYNN A. MICKELSEN (2)
  · LYNN G. ROBBINS (1)
  · M. RUSSELL BALLARD (13)
  · MARK E. PETERSON (7)
  · MARK HOFFMAN (12)
  · MARLIN K. JENSEN (3)
  · MARRIOTT (2)
  · MARTIN HARRIS (5)
  · MASONS (16)
  · MELCHIZEDEK/AARONIC PRIESTHOOD (9)
  · MERRILL J. BATEMAN (3)
  · MICHAEL D. WILLIAMS (1)
  · MICHAEL OTTERSON (1)
  · MICHAEL R. ASH (26)
  · MITT ROMNEY (71)
  · MORE GOOD FOUNDATION (4)
  · MORMON CELEBRITIES (14)
  · MORMON CHURCH HISTORY (8)
  · MORMON CHURCH PR (13)
  · MORMON CHURCH PROPAGANDA (5)
  · MORMON CLASSES (1)
  · MORMON DOCTRINE (35)
  · MORMON FUNERALS (12)
  · MORMON GARMENTS (20)
  · MORMON HANDCARTS (12)
  · MORMON INTERPRETER (4)
  · MORMON MARRIAGE EXCLUSIONS (1)
  · MORMON MEMBERSHIP (38)
  · MORMON MISSIONARIES (142)
  · MORMON MONEY (73)
  · MORMON NEWSROOM (5)
  · MORMON POLITICAL ISSUES (5)
  · MORMON RACISM (18)
  · MORMON TEMPLE CEREMONIES (38)
  · MORMON TEMPLE CHANGES (15)
  · MORMON TEMPLES (116)
  · MORMON VISITOR CENTERS (10)
  · MORMON WARDS AND STAKE CENTERS (1)
  · MORMONTHINK (13)
  · MOUNTAIN MEADOWS MASSACRE (21)
  · MURPHY TRANSCRIPT (1)
  · NATALIE R. COLLINS (11)
  · NAUVOO (3)
  · NAUVOO EXPOSITOR (2)
  · NEAL A. MAXWELL (1)
  · NEAL A. MAXWELL INSTITUTE (1)
  · NEIL L. ANDERSEN - SECTION 1 (3)
  · NEW ORDER MORMON (8)
  · OBEDIENCE - PAY, PRAY, OBEY (15)
  · OBJECT LESSONS (15)
  · OLIVER COWDREY (6)
  · ORRIN HATCH (10)
  · PARLEY P. PRATT (11)
  · PATRIARCHAL BLESSING (5)
  · PAUL H. DUNN (5)
  · PBS DOCUMENTARY THE MORMONS (20)
  · PERSECUTION (9)
  · PIONEER DAY (3)
  · PLAN OF SALVATION (5)
  · POLYGAMY (60)
  · PRIESTHOOD BLESSINGS (1)
  · PRIESTHOOD EXECUTIVE MEETING (0)
  · PRIMARY (1)
  · PROCLAMATIONS (1)
  · PROPOSITION 8 (21)
  · PROPOSITION 8 COMMENTS (11)
  · QUENTIN L. COOK (11)
  · RELIEF SOCIETY (14)
  · RESIGNATION PROCESS (31)
  · RICHARD E. TURLEY, JR. (6)
  · RICHARD G. HINCKLEY (2)
  · RICHARD G. SCOTT (7)
  · RICHARD LYMAN BUSHMAN (11)
  · ROBERT D. HALES (5)
  · ROBERT L. MILLET (7)
  · RODNEY L. MELDRUM (15)
  · ROYAL SKOUSEN (2)
  · RUNTU'S RINCON (78)
  · RUSSELL M. NELSON (14)
  · SACRAMENT MEETING (11)
  · SALT LAKE TRIBUNE (1)
  · SCOTT D. WHITING (1)
  · SCOTT GORDON (5)
  · SEMINARY (5)
  · SERVICE AND CHARITY (24)
  · SHERI L. DEW (3)
  · SHIELDS RESEARCH - MORMON APOLOGETICS (4)
  · SIDNEY RIGDON (7)
  · SIMON SOUTHERTON (34)
  · SPAULDING MANUSCRIPT (8)
  · SPENCER W. KIMBALL (12)
  · STEVE BENSON - SECTION 1 (18)
  · STEVE BENSON - SECTION 10 (17)
  · STEVE BENSON - SECTION 11 (15)
  · STEVE BENSON - SECTION 12 (19)
  · STEVE BENSON - SECTION 13 (21)
  · STEVE BENSON - SECTION 14 (17)
  · STEVE BENSON - SECTION 15 (12)
  · STEVE BENSON - SECTION 2 (21)
  · STEVE BENSON - SECTION 3 (18)
  · STEVE BENSON - SECTION 4 (25)
  · STEVE BENSON - SECTION 5 (22)
  · STEVE BENSON - SECTION 6 (19)
  · STEVE BENSON - SECTION 7 (15)
  · STEVE BENSON - SECTION 8 (13)
  · STEVE BENSON - SECTION 9 (19)
  · STORIES (1)
  · SUNSTONE FOUNDATION (2)
  · SURVEILLANCE (SCMC) (12)
  · TAD R. CALLISTER (3)
  · TAL BACHMAN - SECTION 1 (25)
  · TAL BACHMAN - SECTION 2 (25)
  · TAL BACHMAN - SECTION 3 (25)
  · TAL BACHMAN - SECTION 4 (25)
  · TAL BACHMAN - SECTION 5 (25)
  · TAL BACHMAN - SECTION 6 (25)
  · TAL BACHMAN - SECTION 7 (9)
  · TALKS - SECTION 1 (1)
  · TEMPLE WEDDINGS (6)
  · TEMPLES - NAMES (1)
  · TERRYL GIVENS (1)
  · THE PEARL OF GREAT PRICE (1)
  · THE SINGLE WARDS (5)
  · THE WORLD TABLE (3)
  · THOMAS PHILLIPS (18)
  · THOMAS S. MONSON (33)
  · TIME (4)
  · TITHING (63)
  · UGO PEREGO (5)
  · UK COURTS (7)
  · UNNANOUNCED, UNINVITED AND UNWELCOME (36)
  · UTAH LIGHTHOUSE MINISTRY (3)
  · VALERIE HUDSON (3)
  · VAN HALE (16)
  · VAUGHN J. FEATHERSTONE (1)
  · VIDEOS (30)
  · WARD CLEANING (4)
  · WARREN SNOW (1)
  · WELFARE (0)
  · WENDY L. WATSON (7)
  · WHITE AND DELIGHTSOME (11)
  · WILFORD WOODRUFF (6)
  · WILLIAM HAMBLIN (11)
  · WILLIAM LAW (1)
  · WILLIAM SCHRYVER (5)
  · WILLIAM WINES PHELPS (3)
  · WOMEN AND MORMONISM (86)
  · WORD OF WISDOM (7)
  · WORLD CONGRESS OF FAMILIES (1)
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